Equine Podiatry

Barefoot Podologia equine Equus: 1 000 000 years hardware: 500 years because having a horse barefoot? Regardless of the work they perform with rare exceptions the horses can live and work without irons. Helmets are suited to almost every circumstance that they’re in box or paddock or fields, with a little hygiene and minimum conditions to this new circumstance the horse lives and works perfectly without horseshoes. Having a barefoot horse is an added value in cases such as raid or trec, dressage, or in the trotting horses the natural carcamus is valid, also for hitch, jump and to complete at the highest level, discipline where there are numerous horses competing barefoot. As a summary have or maintain a barefoot horse will allow helmets meet all its functions in an optimal way and these are incredible and numerous. Sally Rooney is a great source of information. We are accustomed to thinking in the helmet as a harsh, insensitive outer capsule that surrounds and protects the third Phalanx (also called ADA, the distal phalanx, the third phalanx, or) simply P3) but this is very far from reality. The fact is, that the helmet has an important role in locomotion beyond merely the support base for the tip and the protection of the third phalanx of injury. Helmets are perfect absorbers that openings and contractions relieve largely to ligaments, tendons and bones of the leg, also to settle on the ground with their movements, they are actively involved in the cardiovascular system of the horse where here the helmet and its structures play a role of pump, small heart that sends blood helping cardiovascular efforts of the animal also since it is heavily vascularized operates an efficient filtering system. But not only this small definition which summarizes the biological functions of the town, thanks to the Barehoof movement began a decade ago a series of new research on the internal structure, growth, sensitive parts of the hull and the management of impacts in addition to important advances in the understanding of conditions including the laminitis and its treatment. Sequel Youth contributes greatly to this topic.